Thursday, October 30, 2014

No More Excuses: You Need the Flu Vaccine


Even healthy people need a flu vaccine.
Influenza (flu) is a contagious disease which affects the lungs and can lead to serious illness, including pneumonia. Even healthy people can get sick enough to miss work or school for a significant amount of time or even be hospitalized. The flu vaccine is recommended for everyone 6 months of age and older.
Pregnant women, young children, older people, and people with certain chronic medical conditions like asthma, diabetes and heart disease are at increased risk of serious flu-related complications, so getting a yearly flu vaccine is especially important for them.

Is the flu vaccine safe?
Yes. The flu vaccine is safe. They have been given to hundreds of millions of people for more than 50 years and have a very good safety track record. Each year, CDC works closely with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and other partners to ensure the highest safety standards for flu vaccines

Can’t I wait and get vaccinated when/if flu hits my community?
It is best to get vaccinated before flu begins to spread. It takes about two weeks for the flu vaccine to provide full protection, so the sooner you get vaccinated, the more likely it is that you will be fully protected once flu begins to circulate in your community.

You need to get a flu vaccine every year.
You need to get a flu vaccine every year to protect yourself against the viruses that research suggests are most likely to circulate each season. There are two reasons for getting a flu vaccine every year:
1. The first reason is that because flu viruses are constantly changing, flu vaccines
may be updated from one season to the next to protect against the viruses
research indicates may be most common during the upcoming flu season.
2. The second reason that annual vaccination is recommended is that a person’s
immune protection from the vaccine declines over time. Annual vaccination is
needed for optimal protection.


Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Stop Bullying!!

 http://www.stopbullying.gov/respond/be-more-than-a-bystander/index.html


The bullying statistics are staggering, with more than 80% of high school students in the U.S. reporting that they witness bullying at least once a week. Statistics also show that more than 1 in 4 children a year (13 million) experience some form of bullying (as the bully, bullied or both). Parents, unfortunately, are often not properly prepared to deal with the complexities of bullying today. Bullying is a concern for parents, but not something they proactively discuss with their children until it directly impacts their child. However, research shows that when parents talk to their kids about bullying, their children are more likely to take action to stop bullying. 

Kids witness bullying every day. They want to help, but they don’t know how. There are safe, simple ways your child can help stop bullying. Teach your kids the 5 bystander tips:

1. Tell a trusted adult, like a family member, teacher or coach.
2. Help the person being bullied get away from the situation.
3. Be a friend to the person being bullied.
4. Set a good example. Do not bully others.
5. Don’t give bullying an audience.


Visit StopBullying.gov to learn more safe, simple ways your child can be more than a bystander.

Monday, September 1, 2014

CURE Childhood Cancer


CURE Childhood Cancer is dedicated to conquering childhood cancer through funding targeted research and through support of patients and their families.CURE Childhood Cancer believes that childhood cancer can be cured in our lifetime.

Cancer kills more children than any other disease.  Until there's a solution for every childhood disease, CURE will be there.



To learn more about CURE and it's work throughout the county visit their website.

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Win "Front Row" Tickets to see Phillips, Craig and Dean!

Concert Details
Congratulations to Julie Bishop from Seneca, SC. She won 4 Front Row tickets to see Phillips, Craig & Dean in Franklin, NC. Thanks to everyone who signed up.

Friday, August 1, 2014

It's Back to School!!



The Summer vacation is over and the next few weeks children all over the listening area will be headed back to school and with the increase of traffic plus more children walking and biking to school it’s important to keep these safety tips in mind:
  • Never pass a school bus on the right. Most of the children who lose their lives in bus-related crashes are pedestrians who are hit by motorists passing illegally.
  • Children are the most unpredictable pedestrians so take extra care to look out for children not only in school zones but also in residential areas, playgrounds and parks.
  • Watch for bicycle riders – they have the same rights and responsibilities as other roadway users but are more difficult to see.  Check your mirrors often and be alert in neighborhoods.
To learn more about driver safety, especially during the beginning of school, please go to the National Safety Council web site.

National Safety Council State Chapters:


National Safety Council, Georgia Chapter
5161 Brook Hollow Parkway ,Suite 220
Norcross, GA 30071-3652
Phone: (770) 729-0077 or Alt. Phone: (800) 441-5103
Fax: (770) 729-0044


Safety and Health Council of North Carolina, Raleigh Office
Cumberland Building, Suite 125, 3739 National Drive
Raleigh, NC 27612
Phone: (919) 719-9800 or Alt. Phone:
Fax: (919) 719-9819


South Carolina Chapter, National Safety Council
121 Ministry Drive Irmo, SC 29063Phone: (803) 732-6778 or Alt. Phone: (800) 733-6185
Fax: (803) 732-6757

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Hope For Haiti July 30-31 On WRAF

WRAF teams up with Cross International to provide food and Christian education to needy children in Haiti. Here's the link to help with your one-time donation.

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Don't Wait Until It's Too Late: Learn How to Spot Skin Cancer™


www.SpotSkinCancer.org


SCHAUMBURG, Ill. (May 1, 2014) – It is estimated that one in five Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer in the course of their lifetime, and one person dies from melanoma – the deadliest form of skin cancer – every hour.
The American Academy of Dermatology (Academy) is encouraging the public to learn how to SPOT Skin Cancer™. The campaign aims to save lives by emphasizing the importance of early detection.
“When caught early, skin cancer is highly treatable,” said board-certified dermatologist, Brett M. Coldiron, MD, FAAD, president of the Academy. “Despite this, many people don’t know how to be their own detective when it comes to skin cancer, including what to look for on their skin or when they should see a dermatologist.”
To increase people’s chances of spotting skin cancer early, the Academy recommends everyone learn the ABCDE rule, which outlines the warning signs of melanoma:
  • A – is for Asymmetry: One half of the mole does not match the other half.
  • B – is for Border irregularity: The edges are ragged, notched or blurred.
  • C – is for Color that varies from one area to another.
  • D – is for Diameter: While melanomas are usually greater than 6mm (the size of a pencil eraser) when diagnosed, they can be smaller.
  • E – is for Evolving: A mole or skin lesion that looks different from the rest or is changing in size, shape or color.
“Although skin cancer is more common among people with light or fair skin, everyone is at risk of getting this life-threatening disease,” said Dr. Coldiron. “SPOT Skin Cancer™ encourages people to invest in their health and spot skin cancer early, when it is most treatable. If you see anything on your skin that is changing, itching or bleeding, you should make an appointment to see a board-certified dermatologist.”
To further learn how to spot skin cancer, visit the Academy’s SPOT Skin Cancer™ website – www.SpotSkinCancer.org – for valuable information and resources on skin cancer prevention and detection, including:
SPOT Skin Cancer™ is the Academy’s campaign to create a world without skin cancer through public awareness, community outreach programs and services, and advocacy that promote the prevention, detection and care of skin cancer.
You can help raise awareness of melanoma and other types of skin cancer by using the hashtag #SPOTskincancer when sharing Academy resources on social media and encouraging friends and family members to take advantage of the Academy’s free skin cancer screenings in their area. Individuals who have been affected by skin cancer can share their personal stories on SpotSkinCancer.org and provide support and inspiration for others fighting skin cancer, as well as communicate the importance of prevention and early detection.

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Josh McDowell Speaking In Franklin, NC

Save Our Children -- Save Our World!

Noted speaker, author and Christian humanitarian Josh McDowell has impacted the lives of millions of people for Jesus Christ worldwide. In all of his travels and all of the wisdom gained from more than 50 years of outreach, Josh sounds the alarm to the Church of Jesus Christ today with one central message: “We must learn a way to disciple children!”

In the face of an epidemic of online pornography, marital infidelity and an escalation in divorce, Josh offers hope to reverse this slippery slope. Join Josh for an evening that will grab your heart. Josh cries out, “If we wait until our children are 13, 14, 15 years old, it’s too late.” But he offers what he calls “the first ray of hope I have seen in the last 15 years as these morality “storms” have taken place.”

Don’t miss noted speaker and author Josh McDowell during Save Our Children—Save Our World. It will change your life and the life of your church.


Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Join The Voices For Recovery


Mental and substance use disorders affect all Americans. By speaking up about issues and reaching out to those who need help, you can help encourage public awareness and inspire others.

If you or someone you know is struggling with mental and/or substance use disorder call 800-662-HELP or visit the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration for more information or treatment referral.  You can help yourself or someone you love take the first step toward recovery.

Spread the message that Prevention Works, Treatment is Effective, and People Recover.